England: Cambridge Program

Summer Study Abroad Program

Five-week program offering courses in literature, psychology, and the humanities at Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge University.

Each year, undergraduate and graduate students travel to Cambridge where they take two courses from offerings in English literature and psychology. Studies are at Gonville and Caius, established in 1348 and the fourth-oldest of Cambridge University's thirty-one colleges. For over three decades, the UNH Summer Program in Cambridge has provided more than 1,600 students with the opportunity to learn first-hand the truth of E.M. Forster's observation: Cambridge is, indeed, a magical place. Discover it for yourself.

Program dates

July 7 - August 10, 2019

Information Session

Thurs, Feb 7, 1 - 2pm, 230 McConnell
Thurs, Feb 14, 1 - 2pm, 102 Ham Smith

Application Deadline

February 22, 2019

Deposit deadline

February 22, 2019

How to apply Financial Aid/scholarships

Contacts

Prof. Monica Chiu
Cambridge Program Faculty Director
Professor of English
Email: monica.chiu@unh.edu

Jim Parsons
COLA Study Abroad Coordinator
Email: james.parsons@unh.edu
Phone: (603) 862-3962

 

At the time of application, all students are expected to meet the following criteria:

  • At least 12 credits earned at UNH
    • Freshmen students not meeting the 12-credit requirement may be allowed to participate in the program. Approval is needed from both the Program Faculty Director. Contact the COLA Center for Study Abroad for guidance.
  • A declared major
  • A minimum 2.5 cumulative GPA
    • Students who do not have a declared major or who have an established GPA between 2.0 and 2.5 may still apply. Admission will be at the discretion of the program faculty director.
  • Good standing with the Student Conduct System
    • A student who is on probation, regardless of the underlying violation, must successfully petition through the Academic Standards and Advising Committee (ASAC) for permission to participate. Students who have had a past violation will also be required to petition. Please contact your Dean’s Office for more guidance and the petition form, if needed.

The program typically enrolls a mix of non-UNH, UNH, undergraduate, graduate, and nontraditional students. While most of our students are enrolled in colleges and universities at the undergraduate or graduate level, every year a significant number of people who have completed their formal college educations participate. Our youngest students are 18; the oldest to enroll thus far was 82. English teachers, history teachers, and others who have earned their Bachelor's degrees frequently enroll to enrich their knowledge in a particular area and earn valuable graduate credits. All that is required is a willingness to work hard for six weeks while experiencing the joys of Cambridge and the United Kingdom.

In order to ensure the transfer of credits back to the student's home institution, all non-UNH students will need to obtain the necessary approvals from their home institutions according to their institution's study abroad policies before applying to the program. This may include approval of the courses by the student's academic department, as well as eligibility approval from the home institution's study abroad office, college dean's office, or judicial office. When submitting course descriptions for approvals, students should be aware that course numbering at UNH may be different than at most institutions:

UNH 400-level course = 100-level (beginning/1st-year) course at most institutions

UNH 500-level course = 200-level course at most institutions

UNH 600-level course = 300-level course at most institutions

UNH 700-level course = 400-level (advanced/4th-year) course at most institutions

UNH 800-level course = 1st-year graduate course at most institutions

UNH 900-level course = 2nd-year graduate course at most institutions

Join us for the University of New Hampshire’s Summer Program in Cambridge, England. Become one of the undergraduate and graduate students who will:

  • Take two of the courses offered in English literature, the humanities, and psychology. All courses are taught by Cambridge University or University of New Hampshire professors.
  • UNH students: fulfill up to two UNH discovery requirements. Studying abroad on the program satisfies the World Cultures Discovery requirement. ENGL 511 fulfills the Humanities and Writing Intensive Discovery requirements. 
  • Live in a private room at Gonville & Caius (pronounced keys) College on Trinity Street, in the heart of downtown Cambridge. Established in 1348, Caius, as it is commonly known, is the fourth-oldest of Cambridge University’s thirty-one colleges.
  • Breakfast and dinners provided
  • Travel to London, Stratford-on-Avon, and other destinations in the U.K. on our program excursions.
  • Explore Cambridge, a magnificent historical city filled with stunning architecture, art, music, theatre, gardens, greens, pubs, punts, monuments and more.
  • Have tea at The Orchard in nearby Grantchester, the lovely village where, 100 years ago, Virginia Woolf, Rupert Brooke, Bertrand Russell, John Maynard Keynes, Augustus Johns and others associated with the Bloomsbury Group spent their summers studying and debating art, literature, economics, politics, and cultural norms.

The Cambridge Summer Program has enjoyed the participation of students from over 380 schools across the U.S.

The program typically enrolls a mix of non-UNH, UNH, undergraduate, graduate, and nontraditional students. While most of our students are enrolled in colleges and universities at the undergraduate or graduate level, every year a significant number of people who have completed their formal college educations participate. Our youngest students are 18; the oldest to enroll thus far was 82. English teachers, history teachers, and others who have earned their Bachelor's degrees frequently enroll to enrich their knowledge in a particular area and earn valuable graduate credits. All that is required is a willingness to work hard for six weeks while experiencing the joys of Cambridge and the United Kingdom.

The Director

Monica Chiu is Professor of English, specializing in Asian American studies, with a current focus on Asian/American graphic narratives and manga. Her monographs include Filthy Fictions: Asian American Literature by Women (Alta Mira, 2004) and Scrutinized! Surveillance in Asian North American Literature (University of Hawai'i Press, 2014). She is a former Fulbright Scholar, teaching at The University of Hong Kong (2011-12). The international Fulbright seminar she organized led to her forthcoming edited collection Drawing New Color Lines: Transnational Asian American Graphic Narratives (Hong Kong University Press). She is a 2008 graduate of the HERS Institute for Women in Higher Education Administration, Wellesley College, and is currently chairing an NSF-funded committee on the recruitment of women and underrepresented faculty in sciences, technology, engineering, and mathematics. She directed the University Honors Program in 2008-2011.

Undergraduate Courses

At the University of New Hampshire, lower-division courses are numbered 400-599; upper-division courses may be numbered either 600-699 or 700-799. The Department of English uses the 600 level to designate courses slightly less advanced than those listed at the 700 level. The Department of History lists the upper-division courses at the 600 level. All courses offered are four-credit courses.

Graduate Courses

Students taking courses on the graduate level participate in all class sessions with the undergraduate students. In addition, they are expected to write a long paper or complete a special project along with other course requirements, and to participate in individual tutorials with instructors as needed in conjunction with the long paper or project. Graduate courses will be taken at the 800 level.

2019 Course Offerings

Students enroll in two courses. Graduate students have the option to enroll in only one course, to allow time for independent research. Any of these courses can be taken as an honors course by arrangement with the instructor. 

 *Non-UNH students should note that a 400-level class is equivalent to a 100-level intro class at most other US institutions.*

English 511: The Monstrous in British Graphic Narratives: Illness, Madness, Mayhem [Major Authors in English], 4 credits, HUMA Discovery

We encounter monsters in popular culture frequently, like the giant kaiju (or beasts) bent on destroying earth in the film Pacific Rim. Human characters’ actions also can be considered monstrous, as in the Netflix series Breaking Bad featuring Mr. White, a nerdy chemistry teacher turned drug lord, or the serial murderer Paul Spector in the BBC series The Fall.   In this course, we will read about monstrosity in contemporary British graphic narratives: who or what is a monster or can be considered monstrous? What is the history of monsters, freaks, and atypical characters? We will interpret the course’s graphic narratives through comics studies, literary criticism, visual rhetoric, and visual theory. Possible graphic narratives include Moore and Gibbons’ Watchmen (anti-heroes); Moore and Campbell’s From Hell (on London’s Jack the Ripper); Green’s Lighter Than My Shadow (sexual violation, anorexia); Dillon’s The Nao of Brown (schizophrenia). Short informal papers, drawing for fun, one class presentation, final formal paper.

For UNH students, this course fulfills the Discovery Program’s Humanities  requirement; English majors may count this as one of the 500-level courses toward their major requirements.

Instructor: Monica Chiu is Professor of English, specializing in Asian American studies, with a current focus on Asian/American graphic narratives and manga. Her monographs include Filthy Fictions: Asian American Literature by Women (Alta Mira, 2004) and Scrutinized! Surveillance in Asian North American Literature (University of Hawai'i Press, 2014). She is a former Fulbright Scholar, teaching at The University of Hong Kong (2011-12). The international Fulbright seminar she organized led to her forthcoming edited collection Drawing New Color Lines: Transnational Asian American Graphic Narratives (Hong Kong University Press). 

English 758: Shakespeare and the Mind

This course is also available for graduate credit as English 858.

This course involves the intensive study of not more than five plays by Shakespeare, including at least two being performed by British companies during the summer session. The primary focus is on the plays in performance, both in Shakespeare's time and in our own. We consider each play in terms of the ways it can be performed and each performance in terms of the way it interprets the play. The class attends productions in London and Stratford-upon-Avon. Film and/or video productions are also used. A substantial library of DVD productions is available for individual study.

Instructor: Paul Hartle received his doctorate from Cambridge University, and is a Fellow and the Director of English studies at St. Catharine's College, Cambridge. An experienced actor and director, he regularly teaches courses in Shakespeare and in the history of drama. He also teaches and publishes in the fields of medieval and late seventeenth-century literature. 

PSYC 561: Abnormal Behavior

Psychology majors may also use it to satisfy a major requirement. 

This course is designed to familiarize you with the vast field of abnormal psychology. Because this is an introductory-level course, you will find that we will cover a lot of topics this semester. Topics will include abnormal psychology past and present, clinical assessment and diagnosis, problems of stress and anxiety, problems of mood, problems of mind and body, problems of psychosis, and life-span problems. Online content, lecture, videos, and case studies will complement your textbook readings.

Instructor: Joan Glutting is a Clinical Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of New Hampshire.  

Non-UNH Transfer Credits

In order to ensure the transfer of credits back to the student's home institution, all non-UNH students will need to obtain the necessary approvals from their home institutions according to their institution's study abroad policies before applying to the program. This may include approval of the courses by the student's academic department, as well as eligibility approval from the home institution's study abroad office, college dean's office, or judicial office. When submitting course descriptions for approvals, students should be aware that course numbering at UNH may be different than at most institutions:

  • UNH 400-level course = 100-level (beginning/1st-year) course at most institutions
  • UNH 500-level course = 200-level course at most institutions
  • UNH 600-level course = 300-level course at most institutions
  • UNH 700-level course = 400-level (advanced/4th-year) course at most institutions
  • UNH 800-level course = 1st-year graduate course at most institutions
  • UNH 900-level course = 2nd-year graduate course at most institutions

The tuition for the UNH Summer Program in Cambridge covers two courses, and the program fee covers a private room, linens, housekeeping service, computer use, most meals (seven breakfasts and five dinners a week) and all excursions, including transportation and entry fees. (For details, please contact the program administrator, Jim Parsons.

The University of New Hampshire mandates different tuition rates for residents and non-residents, and for undergraduates and graduate students. In addition, the Cambridge Summer Program imposes a common student fee to cover room and board, excursions, and other program benefits.

ESTIMATED COSTS FOR 2019

  Undergraduate Students Graduate Students
  NH Residents Non-NH Residents NH Residents Non-NH Residents
UNH Summer Tuition (8 credits) $3,672 $4,048 $2,140* $2,360*
Estimated Program Fee 2,200 2,200 2,200 2,200
Mandatory Fees (technology, registration, international insurance, study abroad administration) 241.25 241.25 241.25 241.25
Total Cost $6,113.25 $6,489.25 $4,561 $4,781

*Graduate tuition rate based on 4 credits. Most graduate students enroll in one class on the program, but may enroll in up to 8 credits. For 8 credits, the tuition rate would be doubled.

The UNH Cambridge Summer Program reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Payment Information and Refund Policy

A $300 non-refundable deposit payment will be due by the application deadline to confirm a participant's spot on the program. Refer to instructions in the online application on how to submit this payment.

View study abroad payment deadlines, cancellation and refund policy

We're interested in what happens to those who have participated in the Cambridge Program and how they feel about their time and studies in Cambridge. Help us by emailing your news below or email us directly at cambridge.program@unh.edu.

Contact Form

The following regulations are excerpted and adapted from the University of New Hampshire booklet on Rights and Rules for use in the UNH Cambridge Summer Program.

The University has the right to expect that students, as members of the academic community, will conduct themselves in ways that are consistent with the educational mission of freedom to learn and that they will respect the right of their fellow citizens. Any departure from these standards that can be shown to be injurious to the Program’s pursuit of its normal activities may be subject to appropriate disciplinary action, which could include dismissal from the Program.

Infractions include but may not be limited to the following:

  • Cheating in coursework
  • Dishonesty
  • Possession or use of hazardous weapons or substances, including fireworks and guns, on College property
  • Lack of respect for others (including verbal abuse, harassment of another person, fighting, sexual harassment or assault, physical assault)
  • Use of physical force or threat of physical force in obstructing activities of other members of the Program
  • The possession, trafficking, or use on College property of any illegal drug
  • Creating fire hazards or making false fire alarms on College property
  • Tampering with fire-safety equipment
  • Failure to evacuate or properly report hazardous or serious incidents
  • Indulging in lewd or indecent behavior in public
  • Theft
  • Trespassing and/or unauthorized entry on any College-held property or on a specific area to which access is usually denied to students in general (such as a student room) or to certain students (such as unauthorized use of showers, bathrooms, etc. by members of the opposite sex when such access is explicitly denied)
  • Destruction, damage, misuse, or defacement of property
  • Misconduct, damage, or loss caused by guests whom a student is host
  • Illegal gambling
  • Disturbing the peace by making unreasonable noise, which includes but is not necessarily limited to the use of mechanical and amplifying equipment
  • Failure to adhere to established in-house regulations when properly publicized by the responsible Program officers, particularly when they concern subjects such as health, safety, building operations, and standards of behavior

The Need for Quiet

Particular attention is called to the need for quiet within the College. It it’s Notes for Conference Members, Gonville and Caius College observes: “The College is a working academic community most of whose Fellows and research students are in residence throughout the year. Conference members are kindly asked to respect their need for quiet.” Your fellow students have the same need.

Discipline

The Director of the Program shall serve as hearing officer or “judicial body.” She or he will take care to observe the right of every student to due process (as defined in the Rights and Rules section of the UNH student handbook, copies of which are available online). The student may appeal the Director’s decision by immediate petition to an Appeal Board made up of UNH faculty members, other than the director, who are teaching in the program.

Penalties

Letter of Censure: This is to be sent to the student and to the dean of students at his or her own home institution.

Jeopardy: A student in jeopardy shall be suspended for a specified period of time and have that suspension stayed with the understanding that further violations may mean the immediate activation of the suspension.

Suspension and dismissal: As indicated in the Program’s Agreement Release, UNH has the right to terminate with no refund of fees a student’s participation in the program for failure to maintain appropriate standards of conduct or for any action which UNH considers to be detrimental to or incompatible with the interest, harmony, and welfare of other students.

Relations with Civil Authorities

Students are separately accountable both to civil law and to standards of conduct maintained by UNH. When these areas of jurisdiction overlap, it is appropriate for the institution to take steps in protecting its own interests. Therefore, the Program reserves the right to follow its normal adjudicatory process whenever a student is accused of a criminal act that also violates Program policy.