Islam Karkour

LECTURER
Office: Languages, Literatures, & Cultures, Murkland Hall Rm G14, Durham, NH 03824
headshot of Islam Karkour

Islam Karkour is from Al-Beheira province in northern Egypt and specializes in teaching modern standard Arabic and common dialects. He earned his Ph.D. in Education, Curriculum, and Instruction, with a concentration in Second Language Acquisition and Intercultural Competence, from the University of New Hampshire. He previously obtained his MA in Educational Technology and TESOL from Manchester University, UK, where he was a Ford Foundation Fellow, as well as his BA in Education from Al-Azhar University in Cairo, Egypt. Dr. Karkour has extensive experience in the field of foreign language education. He began his career as an EFL teacher in Egypt in 2005. Since 2013, he has been working as a lecturer of Arabic at both the University of New Hampshire and the Middlebury Summer Intensive Program. His research interests include intercultural competence, foreign language education, and curriculum design and development. Dr. Karkour has published several articles related to his work on foreign language education and curriculum design. Currently, he is working on projects that explore the relationship between intercultural competence and foreign language education, stemming from his doctoral dissertation on these subjects.

Education

  • Ph.D., Education, Curriculum, and Instruction, Teacher Education, University of New Hampshire
  • M.A., Educational Technology, TESOL, University of Manchester
  • B.S., Education, Teaching English as a Foreign Langauge, Al-Azhar University

Research Interests

  • Curriculum design and development
  • Foreign language education
  • Intercultural competence

Courses Taught

  • ARBC 401: Elementary Arabic I
  • ARBC 402: Elementary Arabic II
  • ARBC 503: Intermediate Arabic
  • ARBC 504: Intermediate Arabic
  • ARBC 595: Arabic Practicum
  • ARBC 631: Advanced Arabic I

Selected Publications

Karkour, I. (n.d.). Why on Earth Would Some People Reject Democracy? An Autoethnographic Reflection on Education and Democracy in Egypt. Interchange. doi:10.1007/s10780-019-09362-4