Exhibitions


 


 

 

The Odyssey Project: An Old Story for Modern Times

October 24- December 14, 2019
(Closed Nov 11, Nov 28-29)

Reception: Wednesday, October 30, 4:30-6:30 p.m.

Fifteen women artists, all members of a long-running book group, were inspired to create art in response to Emily Wilson’s remarkable new translation of The Odyssey; the first English translation by a woman. The artists explore in different styles and media the characters and topics covered in Homer’s ancient poem: the meaning of home; the near impossibility of returning home; loyalty; families; migrants; war; poverty; identity; transformation. Participating artists include, Nancy Berlin, Ruth Fields, Carol Greenwood, Jane Kamine, Colleen Kiely, Marilyn Levin, Jennifer Moses, Karen Moss, Sterling Mulbry, Carla Munsat, Ellen Rich, Judy Riola, Civia
Rosenberg, Sandra Stark and Brenda Star.

Addtional programs: 

The Odyssey: A new adaptation written by Prof. David Richman

Opening night  Wednesday, October 30- 7 p.m., Johnson Theatre: Produced as part of a special collaboration with the Museum of Art and Dept of Art and Art History. For tickets: www.unharts.com or 603-862-7222. The Odyssey: A new adaptation will run through Sunday, November 3.

Wednesday, November 20, 12:10pm–1:10 p.m. Talk: The Odyssey Project: An Old Story for Modern Times, Ruth Fields, Jane Kamine, Colleen Kiely, Jennifer Moses and Sterling Mulbry. Join us to hear how each artist created a visual response to Emily Wilson’s fresh perspective in her newest translation of Homer’s Odyssey. Museum of Art, PCAC

Wednesday, December 11, 12:10-1 p.m. Lecture: Coming Home and Being Home in Homer’s Odyssey, Dr. Stephen. Trzaskoma, Director, Center for the Humanities, discusses the ancient Greek concept of home and the hardships Odysseus and his family endure during his journey to return home after the Trojan War. A218, PCAC

Karen Moss, Circe’s Powers, 2019, mixed media on paper, 22” x 30”

Karen Moss, Circe’s Powers, 2019, mixed media on paper, 22” x 30”


Emily Mason: To Another Place

October 24- December 14, 2019

 

This exhibition traces the artistic arc of a career of a painter who encounters the world as a seamless aesthetic experience. Mason revels in the

beauty of paint itself. She explores and exploits it materiality, pushing technique to the edge. She possesses a remarkable constancy of vision supported by an increasingly nuanced mastery of paint and form. Organized by the Brattleboro Museum Art Center. 

Additional Programs:

Wednesday, December 4, 12:10–1 p.m. Talk: Emily Mason: To Another Place, Chief Curator, Brattleboro Museum & Art Center, Mara Williams discusses works on view. Museum of Art, PCAC

Image credit: Emily Mason, Bust with Majesty, oil on paper, Collection of the Museum of Art UNH frames 20” x 40”, 2015.2.1

Emily Mason, Bust with Majesty, 1975, oil on paper, framed 20” x 40”, Gift of Louis Newman of the David Findlay, Jr. Gallery, Collection of the Museum of Art, UNH, 2015.2.1



Dan Mills: Human Topographies

January 21- April 4, 2020

(Closed March 16–21)

Artist Reception: Thursday, February 6, 5–7 p.m.

Artist Talk: Thursday, February 6, 5:15–6 p.m.

Dan Mills: Human Topographies, Mills will lead a discussion about his studio practice and works on view. Museum of Art, PCAC (Snow date: February 19, 12:10-1 p.m.)

Human Topographies presents a narrow slice of the artist’s wide-ranging and decades-long interest in history, exploration, and games and wordplay to investigate networks—networks of power, trade, and migration that underpin societies, nationally and globally. Mills makes luminous and layered paintings and collages about our shared human history utilizing maps and data to expose the legacies of imperialism: war, colonialism, and the forced displacement of people.

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Dan Mills, Current Wars & Conflicts... (with, by continent, belligerent and supporter groups marked with black and red circles respectively, and Asylum Seekers, Internally Displaced, Refugees, and Stateless marked with a letter for every million, and kill

Dan Mills, Current Wars & Conflicts... (with, by continent, belligerent and supporter groups marked with black and red circles respectively, and Asylum Seekers, Internally Displaced, Refugees, and Stateless marked with a letter for every million, and killed marked with letters for every 250k), 2017, ink on digitally reworked map, 95” x 148.875”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Amy Stacey Curtis: Transfer
January 21- April 4, 2020
(Closed March 16–21)
Artist Reception: Thursday, February 6, 5–7 p.m.

The idea of shared authorship—that visitors complete a work of art through their own understanding—is an organizing principle in Amy Stacey Curtis’ conceptual art practice. Her minimal, yet ambitious, sculptures and installations are activated through audience participation. Visitors to Transfer and mirror IV are invited to touch, perpetuate, and resolve of the exhibit’s five unique works according to a prescribed set of Curtis’ instructions. Supported by the Winthrop L. Carter Gift Fund.

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Amy Stacey Curtis, process image for 99 objects variable, 2019, wood, acrylic

Amy Stacey Curtis, process image for 99 objects variable, 2019, wood, acrylic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Amy Stacey Curtis:  mirror IV

Off site: 3S Artspace, 319 Vaughan Street, Portsmouth

February 7 - March 29, 2020

Meet the artist: Friday, February 7, 5 -8 p.m.

Supported by the UNH Arts Initiative Fund in collaboration with 3S Artspace and Maine Arts Commission, an independent state agency supported by the National Endowment for the Arts, and sponsored by Pierce Aluminum Company.

 

Exhibitions at the Museum of Art

The Museum of Art presents eight to ten changing exhibitions yearly that cover a range of periods, styles, and media. Works from public and private collections throughout New England, as well as the Museum's permanent collection, provide the focus of important, widely acclaimed exhibitions.
Past exhibitions have included the etchings and engravings of Dürer and Rembrandt, contemporary work by New Hampshire artists, New England landscape painting, and nineteenth-century Japanese prints, among others. The Museum of Art has also produced a series of major exhibitions examining the artistic heritage of New Hampshire, focusing on the Isles of Shoals, the White Mountains, the art colonies of Cornish and Dublin, New Hampshire folk art, and the state's traditional arts made of wood.

The Museum of Art also regularly presents exhibitions of the University of New Hampshire's art faculty members, alumni, and graduate and undergraduate art students.

Our exhibitions and programs are supported in part by the Friends of the Museum of Art.


Ongoing

On View in the Mills Courtyard

 

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Cardinal, Dale Rogers, Photo Valerie Lester

Cardinal,  powder-coated steel, eight-foot-tall sculpture, 2016, Dale Rogers, Photography Valerie Lester 

 

Dale Rogers: Cardinal

Cardinal, an enlarged version of the popular red bird found on his 2012 Bird in Hand sculpture. This arresting sculpture is placed at the intersection of Main Street and Pettee Brook Lane. Rogers’ outdoor sculptures maintain a human-scale and recognizable imagery to make them approachable. He entices people to get close to the work through the ease of familiar designs and the appeal of organic flowing lines and elegant mix of durable materials.

Rogers believes it is important to make art accessible to the public. “Art,” he states, “is the spark that feeds the imagination and generates conversation.” We couldn’t agree more. I wish to thank Dale and “Team Rogers,” the artist’s crew of studio assistants and metal and glass fabricators, for their collegiality and help coordinating the installation of these two captivating sculptures.

Wendy Klemperer, Chain-Hound VI, 2000, steel and epoxy, 48” x 60” x 48”, photo credit: Lisa Nugent

Wendy Klemperer: Restraint and Release

Brooklyn-based artist Wendy Klemperer fashions arresting, realistic looking wildlife sculptures from welded scraps of steel—a material that conveys the raw, untamed quality of the animals she depicts. Wendy Klemperer: Restraint and Release is on view in the Mills Courtyard with support from the FEDCO Charitable Foundation.