Related Programs

Dual Major in Justice Studies

The Justice Studies Dual Major is intended for Students who are looking for careers in the justice system or who seek graduate training in Law or Social Sciences and Humanities related to the Law. Justice Studies is an interdisciplinary area that blends topics from Humanities Departments (e.g. Philosophy), Social Science Departments (e.g. Psychology, Sociology, Women’s Studies), Departments that include both Humanities and Social Science Faculty (History, Political Science), and professionally-oriented Departments (Education, Family Studies, Social Work). Students will be required to choose a first major before they are able to declare Justice Studies as a second major. The goal is to produce graduates who have a higher level of knowledge about law and justice in American society and in the world so that they will mature into more knowledgeable and effective citizens. 

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History and Philosophy of Science Minor

Why have people in different periods had such strangely diverging views on such questions as the motion of the heavens, or the nature of the human body, or the logic that governs human actions and desires? And what do these differences say about the truth of our own views? It is a puzzling reality of world history that the human understanding and experience of nature, society, and the mind have varied greatly with place and time. This minor provides students with an opportunity to explore this intriguing variety - both in terms of its historical origins and its philosophical implications. The minor is highly interdisciplinary, offering courses in such diverse departments as economics, history, mathematics, philosophy, and psychology. It presupposes no specialized scientific background and may be combined with any undergraduate major. Five 4-credit courses are required for the minor, with no more than three from any single department.

Students interested in minoring in history and philosophy of science should contact the coordinator, Jan Golinski, Horton Social Science Center. 

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