Sidore Lecture Series

woman for decoration only for Sidore Series on Aging

Aging in America: Justice for All?
 

The 2021–2022 Sidore Lecture Series


The COVID-19 pandemic has once again revealed to the broader population that, while we are all aging and older adults are core members of our communities, older adults also face major social and health related disparities. In the US, aging is often seen not as something to honor and revere but as something to fight and avoid. This cultural reluctance to embrace aging, and failure to see diversity and different needs of older adults has resulted in structures and systems that do not adequately support people as they age nor their families and caregivers. This leaves older adults, family systems, and our communities multiply vulnerable. For many older people of color, LGBTQ older adults, and others, these barriers are heightened by disadvantages accumulated across a lifetime, such as inequities associated with racial, socioeconomic, and educational status. This lecture series is intended to examine these disparities, which are woven into the current fabric of our society and spark considerations for new systems—ones designed to honor, celebrate, and care for our older adults. 

The 2021–2022 Saul O Sidore Memorial Lecture Series, “Aging in America: Justice for All?”, explores changing demographics in the US and how long-standing age-related biases in our society affect our health and well-being with the aim to broaden our understanding and awareness of agism as it intersects with racism, gender, sexuality, and class.  It also celebrates the diversity of older adults and how attention to aging and disability can innovate and improve how we design, inhabit, and grow more sustainable communities.  Speakers in the series aim to stimulate conversations among the UNH and broader communities about the roles we each play in creating the environment we want to age in—now and in the future. In this vein, our sessions include both keynote speakers and community-based panel sessions with area older adults, governmental and private service providers, and others. The resulting conversations will endeavor to empower individuals, UNH, and the greater community, to capitalize on the positive aspects of aging and build person-centered systems and communities that support all of us as we age.

 

 

LGBTQIA+ The Social Injustice of Being Forced Back in the Closet (Previously held April 13, 3:30PM -5:00pm, 2022)

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 co-sponsored by Phi Beta Kappa...Rosemarie Garland-Thomson, Distinguished Guest Lecture: Building a World that Includes Disability (Previously Held March 24, 2022)

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design for Aging: Engineering, Accessibility, and Intergenerational Partnerships (Previously held March 3, 2022)

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Aging in Place: Black Perspectives (previously held Feb 8, 2022)

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Caregiving: Honor and Burden, Contributions, and Impact (previously held November 9, 2021)
 

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Aging in America: We Are All in This Together  (Previously held Oct 6, 2021)

This session set the context of aging in the United States by framing changing demographics, the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on marginalized groups, and the role we all play in shaping our own future as aging adults. Learn more about this session and keynote speaker Margaret Franckhauser.

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profile photo Kate wearing red top and draped scarf

Graphic Recording - Live Mural Making
Kate Crary
is a Project Director with UNH’s Institute for Health Policy and Practice. Her work includes policy analysis, project management, group and organizational strategic planning, and curriculum delivery and development. In addition to this work, Kate serves as a Person-Centered Systems and Planning Educator for the Center on Aging and Community Living. She is also a certified long-term care Ombudsman, and much of her work focuses on person-centered systems change, and resident’s rights. A life-long artist, Kate has been developing and sharing her graphic recording skills for more than 7 years throughout New England.

For this year’s Sidore Lecture Series, Kate will be creating unique artwork for each session. This artwork will be created live during each presentation, and will be in mural-sized. Each art work will flow into the next, creating a final, large scale, immersive mural at the end of the series, capturing the spirit and intention of Aging In America: Justice For All?


The series is being organized by Casey Golomski (Associate Professor of Anthropology), Allison Wilder (Faculty Fellow, UNH Center on Aging and Community Living and Associate Professor, UNH Department of Recreation Management and Policy), Laura Davie (Director of Long Term Care and Aging/Co-Director Center on Aging and Community Living, UNH Institute for Health Policy and Practice), Jennifer Rabalais (Project Director/Co-Director, Center on Aging and Community Living, UNH Institute on Disability Project Director), Allyson Ryder (Assistant Director, UNH Office of Community, Equity and Diversity), and Kate Crary (Project Director, UNH Institute for Health Policy and Practice and Center on Aging and Community Living).


The Saul O Sidore Memorial Lecture Series was established in 1965 in memory of Saul O Sidore of Manchester, New Hampshire. The purpose of the series is to offer the University community and the state of New Hampshire programs that raise critical and sometimes controversial issues facing our society. The University of New Hampshire Center for the Humanities sponsors the programs.