English Major: Law 3+3 Option (B.A.)

English Major: Law 3+3 Option (B.A.)

UNH English and Law student

What is the English/law 3+3 option?

If you’re interested in law school, our English/law 3+3 degree program offers the possibility of earning both a bachelor's degree and a law degree in six –rather than seven –years of study. After completing three years as an undergraduate and gaining admission to the UNH Franklin Pierce School of Law through the approved process, you will become a full-time first-year law student. After your first year of law study, the credits you earn will count toward the J.D. degree and as credits sufficient to complete UNH's requirements for the bachelor's degree.

Why study English/law at UNH?

UNH boasts both an excellent English program and a highly ranked law school. Experience the ease and convenience of completing both degrees at one institution, as well as the savings in both time and money that this accelerated track offers. English study is excellent preparation for law school and a successful law career.

Potential careers

  • Business executive
  • Communications specialist
  • Editor
  • Government consultant
  • Lawyer
  • Publisher
  • Writer

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This form is only for prospective students who are not already enrolled at UNH. If you are a current UNH student and interested in this program, please reach out to the contact on this page.


Curriculum & Requirements

The 3+3 program offers highly motivated UNH undergraduate students of English the possibility to earn both a bachelor's degree and a law degree in six, rather than seven, years of study. After completing three years as an undergraduate and gaining admission to the UNH Law School through the approved process, the 3+3 program participant will become a full-time first-year law student. Upon successful completion of the first year of law study, the credits earned will be counted toward the JD degree and as elective credits sufficient to complete UNH's requirements for the bachelor's degree.

Eligibility and Admission Process

STEP ONE: Application to the 3+3 English/Law B.A./JD option

Students apply to the program either when they submit their applications to UNH, selecting the English/JD option on the online application, OR after they are admitted to UNH, by applying directly to the English Department’s “English/Law 3+3 Committee.” In both cases, undergraduate applicants must fulfill the general requirements for admission to the English major.

Students applying at the time of admission to UNH will typically present the following high school credentials:

  • A 3.5 GPA in high school (UNH recalculates high school GPA’s to a 4.0 weighted scale)
  • A rigorous high school curriculum defined as the following:
    • 4 years of college prep (CP) or higher English
    • 4 years of CP or higher mathematics
    • 4 years of CP or higher social studies/history
    • Completed at least level 3 of a foreign language
    • 3 or more years of CP or higher laboratory sciencs.
  • A recommended score of 1200 or better (combined Math and Verbal) on the SAT or a 29 on the ACT.

Currently enrolled UNH students applying to the program must:

  • Have a 3.5 GPA in college courses at the time of application.The English Department committee governing admission to the 3+3 program will also consider past SAT scores, maturity, and the ability to complete a highly demanding program of study based on performance thus far.
  • For both groups, it is important to note that satisfying these requirements does not guarantee admission to this program. The review process is holistic (meaning all parts of the application carry weight and influence the final decision) and other components of the application will influence any admission decisions. Available space within the program will also influence who is admitted and how many students can be accepted.

STEP TWO: Application to UNH Law school

To be eligible, students must:

  • Complete all Discovery and major requirements, and accrue at least 98 credits before beginning law school in their Senior year.
  • Maintain at least a 3.5 GPA (including transfer credits) at time of application to law school, and at the end of their Junior year.
  • Take the LSAT no later than December of the final undergraduate yaer (i.e. the Junior year) and earn a score of 157 or above.
  • Submit the law school application through the Law School Admissions Council by January of the calendar year in which the student wishes to enroll in law school.

The Path Through the English Undergraduate Major

Below is a suggested course outline to help guide English undergraduate students participating in the English/Law 3+3 program through completion of their major and Discovery program requirements. Variations to this suggested path of courses may be undertaken with the approval of the student’s English undergraduate advisor.

Plan of Study Grid
First Year
FallCredits
ENGL 401 First-Year Writing 4
Discovery Course 4
ENGL 419 How to Read Anything 4
Foreign Language Course 4
 Credits16
Spring
Discovery Course 4
Discovery Course 4
ENGL 500-level Course (512, 513 count as pre-1800 lit courses; 514, 516 are post-1800 lit.) 4
Select one of the following:
 
ENGL 512
British Literature I Age of Heroes: Beowulf to Dr. Faustus  
ENGL #513
British Literature II Age of Revolutions: Shakespeare to Austen  
ENGL 514
British Literature III: Revolts, Renewals, Migrations  
ENGL 516
American Literature II Money, Migration, and Modernity: Huck Finn to Beloved  
Foreign Language or Elective (if FL is completed in one semester) 4
 Credits16
Second Year
Fall
Discovery Course 4
Discovery Course 4
ENGL 500-level Course (512, 513 count as pre-1800 lit courses; 514, 516 are post-1800 lit.) 4
Select one of the following:
 
ENGL 512
British Literature I Age of Heroes: Beowulf to Dr. Faustus  
ENGL #513
British Literature II Age of Revolutions: Shakespeare to Austen  
ENGL 514
British Literature III: Revolts, Renewals, Migrations  
ENGL 516
American Literature II Money, Migration, and Modernity: Huck Finn to Beloved  
Any 500-700 Level ENGL Course 4
LAW 475 Getting Ready to Succeed in Law School (Option: can instead be taken in second year spring or third year fall.) 2
 Credits18
Spring
Discovery Course 4
Discovery Course 4
ENGL 600-700 Pre-1800 Literature Course (such a Shakespeare, Chaucer, Literature of Early America) 4
ENGL 600-700 Post-1800 Literature Course (such as Victorian Novel, Contemporary American Literature, Postcolonial Literature) 4
LAW 475 Getting Ready to Succeed in Law School (If not previously taken.) 0
 Credits16
Third Year
Fall
Discovery Course 4
Discovery Course 4
ENGL 600-700 Pre-1800 Literature Course (if you took 512 or 513, this can be any 600-700-level ENGL course.) 4
ENGL 600-700 Post-1800 Literature Course (If you took 514, 515, or 516, this can be any 600-700-level ENGL course.) 4
LAW 475 Getting Ready to Succeed in Law School (If not previously taken.) 0
 Credits16
Spring
ENGL 600-700 Race Course Requirement 4
ENGL 600-700-level Elective Course 4
ENGL 787 English Major Seminar 4
Elective Course 4
 Credits16
 Total Credits98

TOTAL: 98 Credits (40 Discovery, 44 English, 4-8 Foreign Language, 4-8 Elective)

NEED: Beyond ENGL 401 First-Year Writing, 3 more WI courses, one in major, one at 600 level.

LAW 475: Students should take LAW 475 Getting Ready to Succeed in Law School at some point during their Sophomore year but no later than the first semester of their Junior year. This course, taught by a UNH Law School faculty member, will teach students how to prepare for a legal education. The course will instruct students on the LSAT exam and offer valuable strategies on how to improve LSAT scores. Such instruction will include administration of practice test questions as well as explanations for answers. This two-credit course will also explain the necessary study skills to excel in law school. 

HONORS: It is not necessary to complete the honors program, but it is possible: Honors in Discovery + Honors in Major with Thesis (See addendum I) .

SEQUENCE:  With the exception of ENGL 419 How to Read Anything and ENGL 787 English Major Seminar, English courses don’t need to be taken in any specific order; the guide above is only a suggestion. In general, 500-level courses should be taken before 600-700 level ones. However, a student could take a class that satisfies the Race Requirement in Semester I of Junior year rather than Semester II, or a pre-1800 600-700 level literature course in Semester II of Junior year.  As long as all the categories listed above are met, students have the flexibility to choose the courses that best meet their interests and schedules. There are some writing and journalism courses that have prerequisites, and students should be careful to note these before choosing upper-level courses in those fields.

ADVISING: It is very important that students progressing through the 3+3 English/Law program maintain close contact with their degree advisor. This will help students remain “on track” to complete degree requirements, and the advisor will guide the student into the next phase of the program, admission to the Law school. Students who plan early and work closely with their advisor may find it possible to include study abroad and participation in other University programs, if desired, but only with careful planning.

All students participating in the English/Law 3+3 program are strongly encouraged to consult with the pre-law advisor on campus: Kevin Sousa, kevin.sousa@unh.edu; 603-862-2062, 110 Murkland Hall.

The Path Through UNH  Law School

This is a possible Law School course outline. Variations to this suggested path of courses may be undertaken with the approval of the student’s Law school advisor. 

Senior/First Year Law (31 credits)

Plan of Study Grid
Fourth Year
FallCredits
LGP 920 Contracts 3
LGP 909 Civil Procedure 4
LGP 960 Torts 3
LSK 919 Legal Analysis and Writing 1 2
LSK 900 Legal Research and Information Literacy 2
LGP 900 The Legal Profession 1
 Credits15
Spring
LGP 969 Article II Sales 2
LGP 916 Constitutional Law 4
LGP 952 Property 4
LSK 920 Legal Analysis and Writing 2 3
LIP 944
or LPI 912
Fundamentals of Intellectual Property
or Fundamentals of Law Practice
3
 Credits16
 Total Credits31

The schedule and track of the second and third years of law school are directed by each student with careful advising from the law faculty.

Students in the English/law 3+3 option complete the requirements of the English major. See the Degree Plan for the recommended path through the English major.

Participation requires that students:

  • Complete all discovery and major requirements and at least 98 credits before beginning law school
  • Maintain a 3.5 or above grade point average, including transfer credits
  • Take the LSAT no later than December of the final undergraduate year and have a score of 157 or above.  
  • Submit the law school application through the Law School Admissions by January 1 of the year in which the student wishes to enroll in law school.

Major Requirements

  1. Students must complete a minimum of 40 credits of with a minimum grade of C-.
  2. The required minimum overall GPA is 2.0.
  3. ENGL 401, 415s, "Literature and..." courses, 444s, ENGL 620 and ENGL 788 may not be used to satisfy major requirements.
  4. A total of six courses must be numbered 600 and above.
  5. One major-required course may be used to satisfy one Discovery category requirement.
  6. Only one online course may count toward major requirements.
  7. Special Topics in Literature courses (e.g. ENGL 693, 787, 797) may be used to satisfy Pre-1800 or Post-1800 and/or Race Requirement areas if the designated topic is appropriate. 
  8. Capstone must be completed with a minimum grade of C. May not be double-counted toward major requirements. Submit a Capstone Declaration form indicating the English course to be taken at the time of registration.

Required
ENGL 419How to Read Anything (Minimum grade of C)4
Select two courses from the following:8
500-level Courses
ENGL/LING 405
Introduction to Linguistics
ENGL 501
Introduction to Creative Nonfiction
ENGL 502
Professional and Technical Writing
ENGL 503
Persuasive Writing
ENGL 510
Introduction to the Digital Humanities
ENGL 511
Major Writers in English
ENGL 512
British Literature I Age of Heroes: Beowulf to Dr. Faustus
ENGL 513W
British Literature II Age of Revolutions: Shakespeare to Austen
ENGL 514W
British Literature III: Revolts, Renewals, Migrations
ENGL 515W
American Literature I Conquest and Nation: First Contact to the Civil War
ENGL 516W
American Literature II Money, Migration, and Modernity: Huck Finn to Beloved
ENGL 517
Black Creative Expression
ENGL 518W
Bible as Literature
ENGL 520
Dystopian and Post-Apocalyptic Fiction
ENGL 521
Nature Writers
ENGL 526
Introduction to Fiction Writing
ENGL 527
Introduction to Poetry Writing
ENGL 533
Introduction to Film Studies
ENGL 534
21st Century Journalism: How the News Works
ENGL 549
In the Groove: African American Music as Literature
ENGL 550
Introduction to the Literature and Culture of Race
ENGL 555
Science Fiction
ENGL #557
Crime and Espionage
ENGL 560
Introduction to Latinx Literature and Culture
ENGL 575
Sex and Sensibility: The Rise of Chick Lit
ENGL 581
Reading the Postcolonial Experience
ENGL 585
Introduction to Women in Literature
ENGL 585R
Introduction to Women in Literature
ENGL 595
Literary Topics
Select two courses from the following:8
Pre-1800 Literature Courses
ENGL 512
British Literature I Age of Heroes: Beowulf to Dr. Faustus
or ENGL 513W
British Literature II Age of Revolutions: Shakespeare to Austen
ENGL 595
Literary Topics (if topic is appropriate)
ENGL 657
Shakespeare
ENGL 693R
Special Topics in Literature (if topic is appropriate)
ENGL #741
Early American Literature: Colonialism, Revolution, Nation
ENGL #751
Medieval Romance
ENGL 753
Old English
ENGL 756
Chaucer
ENGL 758
Advanced Shakespeare
ENGL 758R
Advanced Shakespeare
ENGL 759
Milton
ENGL 767
Literature of the Restoration and Early 18th Century
ENGL #768
Literature of the Later 18th Century
ENGL 780
Drama of Shakespeare's Contemporaries: Will and Company
ENGL 783
English Novel of the Eighteenth Century
ENGL 787
English Major Seminar (if topic is appropriate)
ENGL 787R
English Major Seminar (if topic is appropriate)
Select two courses from the following:8
Post-1800 Literature Courses
ENGL 514W
British Literature III: Revolts, Renewals, Migrations
or ENGL 516W
American Literature II Money, Migration, and Modernity: Huck Finn to Beloved
ENGL 595
Literary Topics (if topic is appropriate)
ENGL 609
Ethnicity in America: The African American Experience in the 20th Century
ENGL 636
Literature and the Environment
ENGL 650
I Hear America Singing: Studying American Literature and Culture
ENGL 681
Contemporary African Literature
ENGL 690
African American Literature
ENGL 693R
Special Topics in Literature (if topic is appropriate)
ENGL #738
Asian American Studies
ENGL 739
American Indian Literature
ENGL 743R
American Literature, 1865-1915: The Birth of the American Empire
ENGL #745
Contemporary American Literature
ENGL 749R
Major American Authors
ENGL #747
Studies in American Poetry
ENGL #771
Victorian Love Poetry
ENGL 773
Literary Modernisms: Return, Revolt, Recycle
ENGL 774R
Modern & Contemporary British Literature: New Departures
ENGL 775
Modern Irish Literature: A Changing Landscape
ENGL 777
The English Novel in the World
ENGL 782
Modern and Contemporary Drama
ENGL 784
English Novel of the 19th Century
ENGL 787
English Major Seminar (if topic is appropriate)
ENGL 787R
English Major Seminar (if topic is appropriate)
ENGL 797R
Special Studies in Literature (Race & Racial Theories) (if topic is appropriate)
Select one course from the following:4
Race, the Construction of Race, and Racial Theory Courses
ENGL 440A
On Race in Culture and Society
ENGL #441
On Race and Culture in Society
ENGL 517
Black Creative Expression
ENGL 549
In the Groove: African American Music as Literature
ENGL 550
Introduction to the Literature and Culture of Race
ENGL 560
Introduction to Latinx Literature and Culture
ENGL 585R
Introduction to Women in Literature
ENGL 609
Ethnicity in America: The African American Experience in the 20th Century
ENGL 650R
I Hear America Singing: Studying American Literature and Culture
ENGL 690
African American Literature
ENGL 693
Special Topics in Literature (subtopic R)
ENGL 693R
Special Topics in Literature
ENGL #738
Asian American Studies
ENGL 739
American Indian Literature
ENGL 743R
American Literature, 1865-1915: The Birth of the American Empire
ENGL 749R
Major American Authors
ENGL 758R
Advanced Shakespeare
ENGL 774R
Modern & Contemporary British Literature: New Departures
ENGL 778
Race and Gender in Film and Popular Culture
ENGL 787R
English Major Seminar
ENGL 797R
Special Studies in Literature (Race & Racial Theories)
Select one additional 500-, 600-, or 700- level ENGL course4
Capstone (one 700-level ENGL course)4

Please see your advisor if you have questions about other courses that might fulfill these requirements.

Law School Requirements

The following summarizes the required curriculum and bar recommended curriculum. 85 credits are required for graduation.

Required courses include:
Administrative Process
Criminal Procedure
Professional Responsibility
Upper Level Writing Course
Upper Level Skills Course

Bar recommended courses include:
Personal Taxation
Business Associations
Wills, Trust & Estates
Evidence

Questions about the English/law 3+3 undergraduate program should be directed to Carla Cannizzaro, academic/career counselor, Department of English, 230F Hamilton Smith Hall, (603) 862-1313.

Questions about UNH Law School entry should be directed to Kevin Sousa, UNH pre-law advisor, 110 Murkland Hall, (603) 862-2062.

Undergraduate students in the English Department at the University of New Hampshire have many options as they advance to degree. They can choose to complete a general English major or opt to follow one of several specialized tracks: English Literature, Journalism, English Teaching, and Linguistics. I. All undergraduate English majors acquire the same core skills. These include:

  • Proficiency in analytical writing, critical thinking, and public-speaking.
  • Knowledge of important literary genres and subgenres
  • Fluency in literary terminology,
  • A broad understanding of British-and-American literature, from the medieval period in England and the moment of first contact in America to the present day.
  • Demonstrated proficiency in writing an analytical essay that offers a sophisticated close-reading or explication of a literary text. This essay will have a clear thesis and proceed in a logical fashion, with interpretive claims supported by evidence from the text.
  • Demonstrated proficiency in literary research and in writing an extended thesis-driven research paper in which sources are correctly and responsibly cited.
  • Demonstrated understanding of how to read across the color line in the US and /or how to analyze literary works written in English from outside the UK and the US--from India, Africa, and the Caribbean, for example.

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