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Ngozi Enelamah

Assistant Professor
Phone: (603) 862-0724
Office: UNH Social Work, Pettee Hall Rm 317, Durham, NH 03824

Dr. Ngozi Victoria Enelamah is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Social Work at the College of Health and Human Services, University of New Hampshire. Her interdisciplinary research and scholarship adopt culturally grounded approaches to address global mental health disparities among Black US-born and sub-Saharan African immigrant and refugee children, youth, and families. Her interventions use biopsychosocial frameworks and adopt an implementation science approach toward promoting and integrating behavioral health into allied services. Dr. Enelamah has over two decades of macro practice, community, and public health experience that has helped to address and strengthen health and education systems. Before becoming a faculty member at UNH, Dr. Enelamah was a non-profit founder/leader and institutional capacity-building specialist. Her training includes an undergraduate degree in Pharmacy from the University of Nigeria, Nsukka, an MBA from the University of Lagos, an Ed.M. from Harvard University, and an MSW and Ph.D. from Boston College.

Courses Taught

  • SW 551: Human Behavior&Soc Envirnmt II
  • SW 840: Race, Culture and Oppression
  • SW 965: Program & Practice Evaluation

Education

  • Ph.D., Boston College
  • M.B.A., University of Lagos
  • Ed.M., Harvard University
  • M.S.W., Boston College

Research Interests

  • Refugee/Immigrant Services
  • Early Childhood Development
  • Child/Maternal Health
  • Emotional/Mental Health--Child/Adolescent
  • Health Disparities

Selected Publications

  • Enelamah, N. V., Lombe, M., Betancourt, T. S., Shen, C., & Williams, D. R. (n.d.). Maternal Subjective Wellbeing and the Cognitive and Socioemotional Outcomes of 3- to 4-Year-Old Children in Nigeria. Journal of Child and Family Studies. doi:10.1007/s10826-023-02763-1

  • Rao, S., & Enelamah, N. V. (2024). Social protection and absorptive capacity: Disaster preparedness and social welfare policy in the United States. World Development, 173, 106443. doi:10.1016/j.worlddev.2023.106443

  • Lombe, M., Newransky, C., Nebbitt, V., Amano, T., Yu, M., Enelamah, N. V., . . . Walden, N. (2023). Individual, familial, and sociocontextual correlates of maternal caregiving among African American adolescents in public housing. Family Relations, 72(5), 2390-2409. doi:10.1111/fare.12870

  • Foell, A., Amano, T., Newransky, C., Nebbitt, V., Lombe, M., Yu, M., . . . Tirmazi, M. T. (2023). Stress Biomarkers in Black Youth: Exploring Psychological, Behavioral, and Socio-Ecological Correlates.. J Urban Health, 100(5), 892-903. doi:10.1007/s11524-023-00776-1

  • Enelamah, N. V., Lombe, M., Yu, M., Villodas, M. L., Foell, A., Newransky, C., . . . Nebbitt, V. (2023). Structural and Intermediary Social Determinants of Health and the Emotional and Behavioral Health of US Children.. Children (Basel), 10(7). doi:10.3390/children10071100

  • Rose-Clarke, K. (2023). Gender (in)equity in global mental health research: A call to action. Transcultural Psychiatry, 60(3), 400-411. doi:10.1177/13634615231180376

  • McMahan, L. D., Lombe, M., Evans, C. B. R., Enelamah, N. V., Chu, Y., Simms, S., . . . Wideman, L. (2022). Getting to zero HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa: Understanding perceptions of locals using the social determinants of health framework. HEALTH & SOCIAL CARE IN THE COMMUNITY, 30(3), E739-E748. doi:10.1111/hsc.13444

  • Nebbitt, V., Lombe, M., Pitzer, K. A., Foell, A., Enelamah, N., Chu, Y., . . . Gaylord-Harden, N. (2021). Exposure to Violence and Posttraumatic Stress Among Youth in Public Housing: Do Community, Family, and Peers Matter?. JOURNAL OF RACIAL AND ETHNIC HEALTH DISPARITIES, 8(1), 264-274. doi:10.1007/s40615-020-00780-0

  • Enelamah, N. V., & Tran, T. (2020). Dimensions of altruism behaviors among Americans in the general social survey. JOURNAL OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR IN THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT, 30(2), 213-227. doi:10.1080/10911359.2019.1673274

  • Lombe, M., Mabikke, H., Enelamah, N. V., & Chu, Y. (2019). Conceptualizing the African child as orphan and vulnerable: A label in need of redefinition?. INTERNATIONAL SOCIAL WORK, 62(1), 62-75. doi:10.1177/0020872817710546

  • Most Cited Publications