Calendar of Events

Upcoming Events

January
21

World Heritage Terracotta Army Exhibition 2:00 PM to 6:00 PM

World Heritage Terracotta Army Exhibition 2:00 PM to 6:00 PM2:00 PM to 6:00 PM - Huddleston Hall Huddleston Ballroom: Full-size museum replicas of the ancient Chinese warriors, chariots and bamboo slips found in the third century BCE Mausoleum of the First Qin Emperor will be exhibited at the University of New Hampshire Jan. 21, 2 to 6 p.m., and Jan. 22 through 30, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The exhibition will take place in Huddleston Hall Ballroom. It is free and open to the public.The Terracotta Army site was discovered in 1974 by local farmers in the Lintong District in Shaanxi, China. It turned out to be one of the greatest archaeological discoveries of modern times. Near the unexcavated tomb of Qin Shi Huangdi lay an army of life-sized terra cotta soldiers and horses, interred for more than 2,000 years. More than 8,800 life-size terra cotta figures of warriors, chariots and horses have been unearthed. The warriors were intended to protect the emperor’s tomb and support him as he reigned over an empire in the afterlife. The terracotta figures are life-like and life-sized, varying in height, uniform and hairstyle according to their rank. They were painted with a colored lacquer finish and equipped with real weapons and armor. Each warrior has distinctive facial features and expressions. The site was named a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1987. The UNH exhibition will feature replicas of 17 warriors, 2 half sized bronze chariots, one horse and 36 bamboo slips, a medium the ancient Chinese used for writing before paper. The slips cover a variety of topics, including law cases from the period. Students and schools may sign up for hands-on workshops and lectures to learn more about the history of the Site by contacting Confucius.institute@unh.edu. This event is sponsored by the Confucius Institute and the College of Liberal Arts at UNH.
January
21

Faculty Concert Series: Nathan Jorgensen, saxophone 8:00 PM

8:00 PM - Johnson Theatre: Nathan Jorgensen, saxophone, with the Portland Jazz Orchestra Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2020 at 8 pm in Johnson Theatre of the Paul Creative Arts Center, on the Durham campus. Free and open to the public. Dr. Nathan Jorgensen will be presenting his faculty recital with the Portland Jazz Orchestra, a professional big band based in Portland, Maine. Started in 2004, the Portland Jazz Orchestra is Maine’s premier concert jazz ensemble. Under the direction of Dr. Chris Oberholtzer, this 18-piece jazz ensemble performs a variety of traditional and contemporary big band literature. The PJO enjoys playing works written by members in addition to literature composed by a variety of jazz artists including Tom Kubis, Matt Harris, Bob Mintzer, Bill Holman and Maria Schneider. The PJO also enjoys playing classic works from the big band libraries of Count Basie, Woody Herman and Stan Kenton. The PJO is made up of professional musicians, many of whom are both performers and educators in New England. Members of the PJO have performed, recorded and toured with numerous artists including: Natalie Cole, Tony Bennett, Bob Mintzer, Marvin Stamm, Barry Manilow, Roberta Flack, the Temptations, the Artie Shaw Orchestra and the Glenn Miller Orchestra.
January
25

UNH Choral Gala Concert 7:00 PM

7:00 PM - Johnson Theatre: The University of New Hampshire Department of Music presents the culminating concert of the UNH Choral Gala, conducted by Alex Favazza, Saturday, Jan. 25, 2020 at 7:00 pm in Johnson Theatre of the Paul Creative Arts Center, on the Durham campus. Students perform together in Middle School and High School Gala Honor Choirs under the direction of the guest clinician conductors. Earlier in the day, individual school choirs also perform for guest clinicians and receive specialized instruction. Performances by those individual choirs are then featured in the evening Gala concert, along with performances by UNH Chamber Singers under the direction of Dr. Alex T. Favazza, Jr. We are pleased to host Dr. Hillary Ridgley, Professor of Choral Music Education, Syracuse University as the Middle School Honor Choir guest conductor and Dr. Andrew Minear, Director of Choral Activities, The University of Alabama as the High School Gala Honor Choir conductor. Dr. Minear will also conduct the UNH Symphony Orchestra with the High School Gala Honor Choir.Free and open to the public
January
26

Auditions for Entry into Acting and Musical Theatre 12:00 PM to 4:00 PM

12:00 PM to 4:00 PM - Paul Creative Arts Center Johnson Theatre: Audition information for the main stage productions produced by the Theatre and Department.
January
28

"College Behind Bars" Screening and Discussion (Sidore Lecture Series) 5:00 PM to 7:00 PM

5:00 PM to 7:00 PM - Memorial Union Building Theater II: College Behind Bars, a four-part documentary film series directed by award-winning filmmaker Lynn Novick, produced by Sarah Botstein, and executive produced by Ken Burns, tells the story of a small group of incarcerated men and women struggling to earn college degrees and turn their lives around in one of the most rigorous and effective prison education programs in the United States, the Bard Prison Initiative. We will be showing a one-hour condensed version of the series, followed by a discussion with an alumnus of the program. Featured Speaker: Giovannie Hernandez (Bard College ’17) In his own words: “I was incarcerated for 11 years and 6 months. While in prison, I earned a GED, completed vocational training and satisfied other mandatory programs. None of this was as meaningful or as transformative as my pursuit of higher education. "For most, prison is an experience without purpose. It is traumatic, exhausting and emotionally and physically damaging. Because our criminal justice system prioritizes punishment over genuine rehabilitation, prison often does not adequately prepare people to return to society. But I got lucky. While incarcerated at New York’s Eastern correctional facility, I was able to attend college through the Bard Prison Initiative (BPI). It was one of the hardest challenges of my life. I took the same classes as students at Bard College — a private, liberal arts school in Hudson, New York. "My educational experience before then had been almost entirely prescriptive. I knew school as a place where educators told me what to memorize, what to think, what to know. It did little more than make me a passive learner, a receptacle for information.”[1] Mr. Hernandez now works as an Operations Manager for the Code Cooperative, a community of people who learn, use, and build technology to create life changing possibilities for individuals and communities impacted by incarceration. [1] https://bpi.bard.edu/tags/giovannie-hernandez/
January
30

Community Discussion 12:40 PM to 2:00 PM

12:40 PM to 2:00 PM - Hamilton Smith Hall 240: Community Discussion on P.E. Moskowitz’ The Case Against Free Speech: The First Amendment, Fascism, and the Future of Dissent. Given material barriers to free speech in an unequal world, Moskowitz argues, there can be no meaningful definition of free speech. Instead, there is a history of the ways in which the concept of free speech has been deployed in the United States, from the country’s founding moments, to Charlottesville and Standing Rock. Moskowitz illustrates the ways in which the concept has been used to silence critics of racism and capitalism. Ultimately, Moskowtiz proposes that activists seek to move the line between action and expression in order to advance equality and true civil liberty. P.E. Moskowitz is a journalist whose work has appeared in The Nation, Wired, The New York Times, The New Yorker, The New Republic, VICE, OUT Magazine and others. They are author of a book about gentrification entitled How to Kill a City: Gentrification, Inequality and the Future of the Neighborhood. The Case Against Free Speech was published by Bold Type Books in 2019. Books are available at The Durham Book Exchange. This event is sponsored by the Department of English and the Department of Women's and Gender Studies.
January
30

Election 2020 U.S. Foreign Policy Forum 6:00 PM to 7:30 PM

6:00 PM to 7:30 PM - Memorial Union Building Granite State Room: Election 2020 U.S. Foreign Policy ForumPresented by the University of New Hampshire and the Council on Foreign Relations How will ongoing trade tensions affect global economies? What would a smaller U.S. presence in the Middle East mean? How serious is climate change and what should world leaders do about it? How should U.S. foreign policy address human rights? Join us at UNH Durham on January 30 at 6:00 p.m. for an in-depth, nonpartisan conversation on these and other critical foreign policy challenges facing the 2020 New Hampshire Primary candidates. Panelists Richard N. Haass, President, Council on Foreign Relations Jeh Charles Johnson, Partner, Paul, Weiss Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP; Former Secretary of Homeland Security; Member, Board of Directors, Council on Foreign Relations Meghan L. O’Sullivan, Jeane Kirkpatrick Professor of the Practice of International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School Wendy R. Sherman, Senior Counselor, Albright Stonebridge Group; Director, Center for Public Leadership, and Professor of the Practice of Public Leadership, Harvard Kennedy School Moderator to be announced
January
31

Advancing the Humanities in the Public Sphere 4:30 PM to 7:30 PM

4:30 PM to 7:30 PM - Three Chimneys Inn: We will be welcoming two fantastic scholars to campus to talk about their experiences with public humanities and the projects they developed in part during our Summer Institute in Public Humanities this past June. Joining them will be UNH scholars and public humanists Eleanor Harrison-Buck, Kabria Baumgartner, and Leah Woods.If you are working in public humanities, thinking of working in public humanities, or wondering what public humanities is, we’d love to have you be part of this conversation, which will cover considerations such as starting and funding a project, working with community partners to share knowledge and create mutual benefit, and finding ways to fit public scholarship into an academic career. We also hope you’ll come if you’re interested in our second UNH Summer Institute in Public Humanities, coming up this June, and would like to learn more about the types of projects you might be able to launch as a participant. Bios and Projects: Elena Creef, Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies at Wellesley College, will be talking about “Reenacting and Remembering the Battle of Greasy Grass, aka The Battle of Little Bighorn,” a cross-cultural meetup for which she is partnering with Lakota, Northern Cheyenne, and Arapaho horseback riders. Associate Professor of History at the University of Connecticut Fiona Vernal will be talking about “A Caribbean Museum,” a community-based archival and oral history initiative, which will include pop-up exhibits and salons about public housing, mobility, and migration. UNH Public Humanities Fellow and Whiting Fellow Eleanor Harrison-Buck, Associate Professor of Anthropology, will be discussing “The Crooked Tree, Belize Museum and Cultural Heritage Center,” sharing her experiences working with community members to build an archaeology museum and cultural heritage center dedicated to Kriol culture. Assistant Professor of English Kabria Baumgartner will be sharing “Stories from the Archives: African Americans in Essex National Heritage Area,” which aims to amplify African American history, literature, and culture in the Essex National Heritage Area. Associate Professor of Art and Art History Leah Woods will be talking about starting a “Prison Outreach Program” in a women’s correctional facility in Concord, with female instructors and mentors teaching marketable and creative skills in furniture-making and woodworking.
January
31

CANCELLED: Faculty Concert Series: Mark Zielinski, trumpet 8:00 PM

CANCELLED: Faculty Concert Series: Mark Zielinski, trumpet 8:00 PM8:00 PM - Bratton Recital Hall: CANCELLED: Faculty Concert Series: Mark Zielinski, trumpet
February
01

UNH Faculty Concert Series: Margaret Herlehy, oboe and Janet Polk, bassoon 2:00 PM

2:00 PM - Johnson Theatre: The University of New Hampshire Department of Music Faculty Concert Series presents Sospiri: Margaret Herlehy, oboe; Janet Polk, bassoon; Daniel Weiser, piano Saturday, Feb. 1, 2020 at 2 pm in Johnson Theatre of the Paul Creative Arts Center, on the Durham campus. The concert is free and open to the public.The program will include Trios for Oboe, Bassoon and Piano. Works include the early chamber work by Beethoven Trio Op. 11 originally for clarinet, cello and piano, the charming and jazzy Divertimento by English composer Paul Carr and the sweeping Romantic grandeur of Marie de Grandval in her Grand Trio.
February
04

Avner the Eccentric: Exceptions to Gravity 7:00 PM

Avner the Eccentric: Exceptions to Gravity 7:00 PM7:00 PM - Paul Creative Arts Center Johnson Theatre: TICKETS FOR THIS EVENT ARE FREE Avner Eisenberg in Exceptions to Gravity is a reminder of the theatrical power that can reside in a single charismatic performer who touches the heart. A master of the art of physical comedy, Avner weaves a spell of poetic simplicity in a show of hilarious predicaments. Avner Eisenberg was described by New York Magazine as “a clown for the thinking man.” His show Avner the Eccentric was a hit of the 1984-1985 Broadway season. He appeared again on Broadway in Ghetto and The Comedy of Errors. Avner is widely known for his scene-stealing portrayal of the holy man in the Michael Douglas film The Jewel of the Nile. Avner studied with Jacques Lecoq from 1971 to 1974. Since then, he has developed a unique physical approach to comedy and acting that he teaches in workshops around the world. Avner continues to tour his one-man show internationally and has won awards at the Edinburgh Festival, the Monte Carlo International Circus Festival, and the Festival Internacional de Pallassos in Barcelona. He won the “Snow Star” for comedy in Switzerland, and the “Lachmesse” award in Germany. There will also be a workshop on Sat Feb 8 from 1-4pm. There will be a sign-up sheet posted for that.
February
06

2020 Study Abroad Fair 11:00 AM to 2:00 PM

11:00 AM to 2:00 PM - MUB Granite State Room: Interested in going abroad?Come meet program coordinators and advisors to get your questions answered. Learn about:Study Abroad ProgramsInternshipsScholarships and Financial AidThere are prizes to win!www.unh.edu/global
February
06

New Hampshire International Seminar: Enrique's Journey 12:40 PM to 2:30 PM

New Hampshire International Seminar: Enrique's Journey 12:40 PM to 2:30 PM12:40 PM to 2:30 PM - Memorial Union Building Theater II: Enrique's Journey: How to Fix Immigration in a Humane Way To cultivate community-wide dialogue on critical global issues, the Global Education Center partners with the International Affairs program to bring leading scholars and practitioners to campus and showcase UNH faculty members' international research interests.Sonia Nazario is an award-winning journalist whose stories have tackled some of this country’s most intractable problems — hunger, drug addiction, immigration — and have won some of the most prestigious journalism and book awards. She is best known for "Enrique's Journey," her story of a Honduran boy’s struggle to find his mother in the U.S.
February
09

UNH Faculty Concert Series: David Newsam, guitar 2:00 PM

UNH Faculty Concert Series: David Newsam, guitar 2:00 PM2:00 PM - Bratton Recital Hall: The UNH Department of Music Faculty Concert Series presents “Some of my Best Friends are… Guitarists” with David Newsam, guitar and featuring guitarists John Mason and Jason Ennis. The concert will be held on Sunday, Feb. 9, 2020 at 2pm in Bratton Recital Hall of the Paul Creative Arts Center, on the Durham campus. The concert is free and open to the public.
February
14

UNH Faculty Concert Series: Faculty Composers Concert 8:00 PM

8:00 PM - Bratton Recital Hall: UNH Faculty Concert Series: Faculty Composers Concert
February
18

Lindberg Lecture: Siobhan Senier 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM

Lindberg Lecture: Siobhan Senier 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM1:00 PM to 2:00 PM - Murkland Hall room 110: Professor of English Siobhan Senier will deliver the annual Lindberg Lecture: Breaking the Build: Digital Humanities and (Re)Constructing Community in the Neoliberal University A reception will be held for Professor Senier at 12:40 p.m. in Murkland 110. The lecture will begin at 1 p.m.Siobhan Senier, professor of English, is the 2019 recipient of the Lindberg Award, given annually to the outstanding teacher-scholar in the College of Liberal Arts. Appointed to the faculty in 2000, Senier focuses on Native American literature, women's studies, sustainability and environmental studies, disability studies, and digital humanities. Her books include “Dawnland Voices: An Anthology of Indigenous Writing from New England” (University of Nebraska Press, 2014), which serves as a model for community-responsive scholarship and establishes Senier as one of the most authoritative scholars on Northeast Indigenous writing. The book’s innovative digital companion, dawnlandvoices.org, is both a literary magazine and an archive of Native American literature from New England. Senier is currently finishing “Sovereignty and Sustainability: Indigenous New England Literary Stewardship in the 20th and 21st Centuries,” to be published by University of Nebraska Press, a book that unites Indigenous studies with ecocriticism and sustainability. The annual Gary Lindberg Award was established by the College of Liberal Arts in 1986 in memory of Professor Gary Lindberg of the Department of English. This lecture is free and open to the public. Contact Dean's Office, College of Liberal Arts, Phone: (603) 862-2062
February
19

The Gate Performance 7:00 PM

The Gate Performance 7:00 PM7:00 PM - Paul Creative Arts Center Johnson Theatre: The Gate is a magical rollercoaster noir mystery tour through Japanese folklore. Directed by Saori Aoki, acclaimed for her work in Japan, USA, Canada and the UK. She started the Kaso Jogi (Virtual Ruler) theatre company to spread her unique fusion of traditional Japanese theatre with western influenced musical theatre, around the world. Audiences will be greeted by the striking original songs of Makoto Honda, and a mysterious gatekeeper welcoming “all ye corpses” with the suspect smile of one who might be an angel, a boatman on the Styx, or an emissary from hell. Breathtaking physical dance-theatre set to original music. This performance will be the world premiere English translation of this raucous adventure. Created and Directed by Guest Artists from Japan’s Kaso Jogi Theatre Company, a Cultural Stages: Woodward International Drama & Dance Initiative Production Written and Conceived by: Saori Aoki and the Kaso Jogi Theatre Company Music by Makoto Honda
February
20

The Gate Performance 7:00 PM

The Gate Performance 7:00 PM7:00 PM - Paul Creative Arts Center Johnson Theatre: The Gate is a magical rollercoaster noir mystery tour through Japanese folklore. Directed by Saori Aoki, acclaimed for her work in Japan, USA, Canada and the UK. She started the Kaso Jogi (Virtual Ruler) theatre company to spread her unique fusion of traditional Japanese theatre with western influenced musical theatre, around the world. Audiences will be greeted by the striking original songs of Makoto Honda, and a mysterious gatekeeper welcoming “all ye corpses” with the suspect smile of one who might be an angel, a boatman on the Styx, or an emissary from hell. Breathtaking physical dance-theatre set to original music. This performance will be the world premiere English translation of this raucous adventure. Created and Directed by Guest Artists from Japan’s Kaso Jogi Theatre Company, a Cultural Stages: Woodward International Drama & Dance Initiative Production Written and Conceived by: Saori Aoki and the Kaso Jogi Theatre Company Music by Makoto Honda
February
20

Faculty Concert Series: Mark Shilansky, jazz piano 8:00 PM

Faculty Concert Series: Mark Shilansky, jazz piano 8:00 PM8:00 PM - Bratton Recital Hall: Mark Shilansky presents a recital in solo, duet, and group settings, with Nathan Jorgensen - saxophones, Kathleen Flynn - soprano, Sarah Kervin - alto, Chris Klaxton - trumpet, Nick Grondin - guitar, Keala Kaumeheiwa - bass, and Austin McMahon - drums. Selections include original jazz compositions and music by John Musto, Samuel Barber, and Cole Porter.
February
21

The Gate Performance 7:00 PM

The Gate Performance 7:00 PM7:00 PM - Paul Creative Arts Center Johnson Theatre: The Gate is a magical rollercoaster noir mystery tour through Japanese folklore. Directed by Saori Aoki, acclaimed for her work in Japan, USA, Canada and the UK. She started the Kaso Jogi (Virtual Ruler) theatre company to spread her unique fusion of traditional Japanese theatre with western influenced musical theatre, around the world. Audiences will be greeted by the striking original songs of Makoto Honda, and a mysterious gatekeeper welcoming “all ye corpses” with the suspect smile of one who might be an angel, a boatman on the Styx, or an emissary from hell. Breathtaking physical dance-theatre set to original music. This performance will be the world premiere English translation of this raucous adventure. Created and Directed by Guest Artists from Japan’s Kaso Jogi Theatre Company; a Cultural Stages: Woodward International Drama & Dance Initiative Production, Written and Conceived by: Saori Aoki and the Kaso Jogi Theatre Company, Music by Makoto Honda