Jeannie Sowers

PROFESSOR
Phone: (603) 862-1752
Office: Political Science, Horton Social Science Center Rm 341, Durham, NH 03824
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Jeannie L. Sowers is Professor and Chair of the Political Science Department at the University of New Hampshire. She studies environmental politics and comparative politics, with a focus on the Middle East and North Africa.

Prof. Sowers teaches courses in environmental politics, Middle East politics, comparative politics, and international relations for the Department of Political Science and the International Affairs Program. A non-resident fellow in the Foreign Policy Program of the Brookings Institution for 2022-2023, she was on leave as a Faculty Fellow at the Crown Center for Middle Eastern Studies at Brandeis University during 2021-2022.

Her most recent book is the co-edited Oxford Handbook of Comparative Environmental Politics, in press. Other books include Modern Egypt: What Everyone Needs to Know (co-authored with Bruce Rutherford, Oxford University Press, 2018), Environmental Politics in Egypt: Experts, Activists, and the State (Routledge, 2012) , and the co-edited Journey to Tahrir: Revolution, Protest, and Social Change in Egypt (Verso, 2012). She has published articles in International Affairs, Security Dialogue, Climatic Change, Development and Change, International Environmental Agreements, the International Journal of Middle East Studies, Middle East Report, and Current History, among others.

Prof Sowers serves on the editorial board of Global Environmental Politics, is a member of Environmental Studies Executive Committee for the International Studies Association (ISA), and and a former editorial board member for Middle East Report.
She holds a BA from Harvard University and PhD. from Princeton University. She has held postdoctoral fellowships and visiting appointments at Brandeis University, Harvard University and Oxford University. Her research has been funded by Harvard University’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, the Gerda Henkel Stiftung, the American Council of Overseas Research Centers, and the Institute for the Study of World Politics, among others.

Education

  • Ph.D., Political Science, Princeton University
  • M.A., Political Science & Government, Princeton University
  • B.A., Harvard University

Research Interests

  • Conflict and human security
  • Egypt
  • Environmental politics and social change
  • Middle East
  • Political Ecology
  • Political economy
  • Political Science
  • Social movements
  • War and Society

Courses Taught

  • IA 501: Global Issues Intrntnl Affairs
  • IA 695: Independent Study in IA
  • POLT 444: Politics &Policy Warming World
  • POLT 559: Comp Politics of Middle East
  • POLT 695: Independent Study
  • POLT 740/840: States and Societies Mid East
  • POLT 751/851: Comp Environmental Politics

Selected Publications

Sowers, J., & Weinthal, E. (2021). Humanitarian challenges and the targeting of civilian infrastructure in the Yemen war. International Affairs, 97(1), 157-177. doi:10.1093/ia/iiaa166

Sowers, J. L., VanDeveer, S. D., & Weinthal, E. (2021). The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Environmental Politics.

Weinthal, E., & Sowers, J. (2020). The water-energy nexus in the Middle East: Infrastructure, development, and conflict. WILEY INTERDISCIPLINARY REVIEWS-WATER, 7(4). doi:10.1002/wat2.1437

Weinthal, E., & Sowers, J. (2019). Targeting infrastructure and livelihoods in the West Bank and Gaza. International Affairs, 95(2), 319-340. doi:10.1093/ia/iiz015

Sowers, J. L., Weinthal, E., & Zawahri, N. (2017). Targeting environmental infrastructures, international law, and civilians in the new Middle Eastern wars. Security Dialogue, 48(5), 410-430. doi:10.1177/0967010617716615

Sowers, J., Vengosh, A., & Weinthal, E. (2011). Climate change, water resources, and the politics of adaptation in the Middle East and North Africa. CLIMATIC CHANGE, 104(3-4), 599-627. doi:10.1007/s10584-010-9835-4

Sowers, J. (2007). Nature Reserves and Authoritarian Rule in Egypt. The Journal of Environment & Development, 16(4), 375-397. doi:10.1177/1070496507309112